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Scrum a Agile Approach


Scrum is a software engineering which falls under agile software development. It consists of series of steps and predefined roles. The roles are as follows:
Scrum Master is the one who manages the development process Ex: Project Manager.
Team is the one who do the analysis, design, implementation, testing etc.
Product Owner is one for whom the product is being developed.
The scrum follows sprints (short term plans), each sprint lasts between one or four weeks. The sprint consists of set of tasks which are to be completed in a specific time frame. Before each sprint a team meeting takes place and the tasks to be completed in sprint are identified, followed by estimation of total time the each task in sprint may consume to commit.

A key principle of Scrum is its recognition that during a project the customers can change their minds about what they want and need (often called requirements churn), and that unpredicted challenges cannot be easily addressed in a traditional predictive or planned manner. As such, Scrum adopts an empirical approach—accepting that the problem cannot be fully understood or defined, focusing instead on maximizing the team’s ability to deliver quickly and respond to emerging requirements.
Like other agile development methodologies, Scrum can be implemented through a wide range of tools. Many companies use universal software tools, such as spreadsheets to build and maintain artifacts such as the sprint backlog. There are also open-source and proprietary software packages dedicated to management of products under the Scrum process. 

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